Maul Foster & Alongi Scientists Invited to Share Expertise at 2010 Battelle Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds

Author: James J. Maul, RG, LHG Published: January 12, 2010

Ms. Amy Dvorak, Mr. Alan Hughes, and Mr. James Peale were invited to present at the Seventh International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds in Monterey, California, on May 24-27, 2010.

Ms. Dvorak will present a platform and supporting paper coauthored with Mr. Peale and Mr. Erik Bakkom of MFA titled “Predictions and Reality: Quantified Sustainability Evaluation of TCE Source Area Remediation Using EPA Performance Metrics”. This paper presents the results of a predictive comparison of remediation technologies for a large chlorinated-solvent-plume site, using federal requirements for green acquisition as defined by Executive Order 13423-2007 and EPA’s Green Remediation: Incorporating Sustainable Environmental Practices into Remediation of Contaminated Sites. Data to support the quantification of sustainability metrics were collected during implementation of the selected remedy, and are compared to the predicted impacts. The presentation will identify the effectiveness of standard tools used to predict the relative sustainability of popular remediation technologies and will highlight the importance of evaluating sustainability impacts during the remedy selection process.

Mr. Hughes will present a poster and supporting paper coauthored with Mr. Steve Taylor and Mr. James Maul of MFA titled “Successful Steam-Enhanced Remediation of PCP NAPL Leads to Community Revitalization”. The paper describes the successful implementation of steam-enhanced remediation of a large pentachlorophenol groundwater plume and associated persistent light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) body. By working cooperatively with the Washington State Department of Ecology, MFA and the client were able to rapidly reduce groundwater impacts, remove the source of ongoing groundwater impacts (i.e., LNAPL body), prevent impacts to an adjacent national wildlife refuge, and prevent a Superfund listing for the community waterfront.

Mr. Peale will present a poster and supporting paper coauthored with Mr. Bakkom titled “Elucidation of Abiotic Pathways during Successful ISCR-Enhanced Bioremediation of a TCE Source Area”. The paper describes the successful implementation of microbially-enhanced in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) of a large and deep trichloroethene (TCE) source area, with TCE concentrations consistent with the presence of dense NAPL (DNAPL). Typically, bioremediation would not be recommended for TCE DNAPL source areas, but MFA demonstrated that the combination of bioremediation (using KB-1™) and ISCR (using EHC™) would be successful and cost effective. The performance monitoring data confirmed that both biologically mediated and abiotic degradation were responsible for removing between 97 and 99 percent of the source TCE within six months of implementation. The project demonstrated that ISCR-enhanced bioremediation is appropriate for TCE DNAPL source areas.

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